Recently, Scotch & Soda won the WGSN Futures Award for the best digital innovation in the category Retail & Digital Innovation. The campaign The Story of Things shows, how a fictional story can be extended into the real world.  This mixing of fact and fiction is called faction marketing. 

Lola in Amsterdam. Source: Scotch & Soda

Lola in Amsterdam. Source: Scotch & Soda

A short film tells the story of a brother's journey and about the things he sends home to his younger sister. Driven by the story, which is inherent in every piece, the sister embarks finally on the journey and leaves the apartment with the collected memorabilia.
This certain apartment is located in the capital of Scotch & Soda, in Amsterdam, and can be rented via AirBnB. As a visitor, you get the chance to dive into the story – and on top, you could buy the displayed clothes or furniture. 

The apartment in the heart of amsterdam. Source: Scotch & Soda / AirBnB

The apartment in the heart of amsterdam. Source: Scotch & Soda / AirBnB

Great idea – boring script

The creative idea of the campaign is worth to be awarded. But: Does this campaign really fascinate and bind customers? The story is too pale and not authentic. The characters are lacking substance, a certain charm is missing. As a user, I don’t feel involved and don’t get any emotional tie to the products or the actors. Why using Models when there are real people exactly living the way, the film and the apartment want to show us? For example, Secret Souk or Harvest & Company from Amsterdam live exactly this passion for collecting things. 

Another approach could be creating a series for Netflix or other social network channels with a fascinating story with credible characters and real actors. Who would not love to rent an apartment of Francis Underwood or buy the clothes of Carrie Bradshaw? Or raiding James Bond’s wardrobe?

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